Public Health in the News – March 16th

Global

  • Rice was genetically modified to contain Vitamin A. Many groups opposing genetically modified foods stopped this “Golden rice” from being introduced to countries around the world. Many people have died or have gone blind since then due to Vitamin A deficiencies.
  • The World Health Organization is making new recommendations for how much sugar adults should be consuming, which many US companies are expected to fight.
  • England is downgrading the importance of doing practical science within schools, while other countries are increasingly emphasizing it.

National

  • Federal officials are proposing sweeping new requirements for American health care facilities — from large hospitals to small group homes for the mentally disabled — intended to ensure their readiness to care for patients during disasters.
  • Registration for the insurance under the Affordable Care Act fell in February for the second month in a row, though the Obama administration anticipates a surge toward the end of March, when the open enrollment period ends.
  • Do activity tracking gadgets really work? and are they worth the money? A New York Times reporter tests 11 different models and shares his experience. Recent research also shows that these devices are better at capturing some types of activity over others.
  • A New York Times opinion piece advocates for drug testing medical professionals.
  • A new blood test may be able to identify Alzheimer’s before symptoms appear.

Northwestern

Cover Photo by Tookapic via Pexels: Creative Commons

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About NPHR Blog (184 Articles)
The is the blog of the Northwestern Public Health Review journal. The blog and journal are both student run and contain research articles, opinions, interviews and other content pertaining to public health.

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