Public Health in the News- April 17th, 2016

Global 

  • Will yellow fever gain a foothold in Asia? “… if it does it would be a public-health disaster,” says an expert on mosquito-borne diseases at Duke-NUS Medical School in Singapore.
  • Starting today, 155 countries around the world will switch to a new polio vaccine in an attempt to make polio the second human disease eradicated.
  • Is a water shortage in our not too distant future? Recent studies reveal a startling conclusion– by the year 2050, half of the world’s population may be facing what scientists are calling a “high risk of severe water stress.”

National

  • CRISPR-Cas9 genomic editing: from bench to supermarket shelves. The USDA will not regulate a mushroom genetically modified with CRISPR to resist browning.
  • The quest to uncover novel compounds intended to prevent and treat Alzheimer’s disease is an increasingly pressing public heath concern. A recent NOVA documentary provides a glimpse inside the lives of both patients and caregiver’s.
  • Porn- a private matter or a public health crisis? Scientists take a health-focused view of porn illustrating that “exposure to and consumption of porn threaten the social, emotional and physical health of individuals, families and communities.”

Chicago/Illinois

  • Mayor Emanuel announces plans to work with Covenant House International to expand shelter for homeless youth in Chicago.
  • A water-testing program will be re-instated as a proactive measure to protect the health and safety of Chicago residents.

Northwestern 

  • As of Fall Quarter 2016, Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS) will be lifting its current 12-session limit.
  • Northwestern researchers have developed a tool to protect coral reefs around the world from climate change
Caitlin Pegg, PhD Student at Northwestern University 
Blog Manager
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About NPHR Blog (223 Articles)
The is the blog of the Northwestern Public Health Review journal. The blog and journal are both student run and contain research articles, opinions, interviews and other content pertaining to public health.

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