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Public Health in the News – March 29, 2015

Global

National

Illinois/Chicago

Northwestern


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Public Health in the News – March 22, 2015

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Illinois/Chicago

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Public Health in the News – March 15, 2015

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Chicago/Illinois

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Public Health in the News – March 8, 2015

Global

  • China has made dramatic policy improvements to try to improve air quality within the country. One of the driving forces behind these changes came from tweets about air pollutants from the U.S. Embassy in Beijing.
  • Major pollution problems exist in Europe’s rivers and lakes, leading to decreased biodiversity.

National

Chicago

Northwestern


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Public Health in the News – March 1, 2015

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National

Chicago 

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Public Health in the News – February 15, 2015

Global

  • The UK has voted in favor of allowing a method that would result in babies with three parents. This would help prevent parents from passing along certain genetic diseases to their children. The BBC has a great explainer for how this process works.
  • “Roughly half the adult male population of Chichigalpa, Nicaragua, is suffering from an often deadly kidney disease that appears to be linked to their work as sugarcane cutters.” Now one filmmaker is trying to document these workers’ stories.
  • Motorcycles, which are becoming increasingly common in Asia, are leading to many deaths, leading some experts to label this a rising global health crisis.

National

Chicago/Illinois

  • The Chicago Department of Public Health recently hosted a competition for university students: the Healthy Chicago Innovation Challenge. Two projects, focused on foodborne illness and on financial resources for low-income pregnant women, were the finalists and will each undergo a pilot study.
  • Illinois now has 13 confirmed measles cases.

Northwestern


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New Issue of the Northwestern Public Health Review!

new NPHR cover page

We are excited to share the newest issue of the NPHR with you. Our latest issue highlights a wide range of public health topics from the impact of landmines in Colombia to the role of energy in promoting public health access. Art illustrations from the UIC biomedical visualization program accompany and enrich each story.

In “Can Public Health be improved with Energy Access?” Dr. Halley Aelion (U.S Department of Energy) and Dr. Amul Tevar (Ohio State) review both personal experiences and scientific data on the role of energy access in promoting health access locally and around the world.

In “Water, Typhoid Rates, and the Columbian Exposition in Chicago” Dr. Browyn Rae carefully reviews early scientific and public health efforts to manage the typhoid outbreak in Chicago at the cusp of the famous Columbian exposition in Chicago.

“A Call for Help from the Landmine Victims in Colombia” explores the history of the Colombian Civil War and its public health impacts. Juan Pablo Calderon Meza dissects the impact of landmines on the morbidity and mortality of Colombians.

Shruti Zaveri explores the causes and impact of cancer in Asian American communities. According to Shruti, “In many ways, the cancer burden is unequally distributed in various populations within the US. While Asian Americans have the lowest cancer incidence when compared to other ethnic groups in the US, cancer is still the leading cause of death among Asian Americans. Much of the Asian American cancer burden is unnecessary and caused by several avoidable factors including lack of cancer education, barriers to both healthcare and cancer screening, and ultimately a culturally ineffective effort to solve the issue”.

Additional articles in the current issue of the NPHR include a book review of “The Book of Woe: The DSM and the Unmaking of Psychiatry”, Healthcare Access for Lesbian and Bisexual Women in Cape Town, South Africa, as well as an interview with both the first MD/MPH student, Dr. Kathryn Andolsek, and the founder of NU’s MPH program, Dr. Jeremiah Stamler.

We invite you to share your impressions, questions and suggestions with us as you go through this issue. PDF versions of the newest issue can be downloaded at www.nphr.org


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Public Health in the News (February 8th, 2015)

Global

National

  • Ever wondered how many microorganisms are in your public transportation system? An 18 month old research experiment in New York City (pathomap) attempts to track and inventory the diversity of bacteria in New York subway system.
  • A recent MMWR report from CDC indicates that the number of Blacks and Hispanics dying from HIV in the past 5 years has dropped.
  • Convinced that its initial $500 million pledge to halt childhood obesity is having an impact, the Robert Woods Johnson foundation is pledging an additional $500 million towards ending childhood obesity.
  • February is National Heart Awareness Month. As a concrete step towards improving cardiovascular health outcomes, the  CDC initiated the Million Hearts™ challenge.
  • A strange paradox was unveiled this week as it has became clear that rapidly declining Ebola rates might make it difficult to test newly developed Ebola vaccines – great news for countries that struggled with the disease but difficult news for drug discovery efforts.

 Local

  • 5 Chicago area children have now been confirmed to have the measles, further intensifying the ongoing vaccination debate.
  • A recent report from the Illinois state’s auditor general released Thursday found $3.7 million was paid for medical care for over 1,000 people who were already dead. Furthermore the report showed that nearly 6,000 people were still marked as eligible for medical services despite being listed as deceased.

Northwestern

  • Dr. Robert Murphy gave an exclusive interview on the growing  national measles concern with WGN Chicago.
  • Dr.Michelle Birkett was recently highlighted in the Huffington discussing LGBT associated bullying and recent research observations that it gets  better with time.
  • The Northwestern Public Health review Review recently released its fall issue at www.nphr.org


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Public Health in the News – February 1, 2015

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Chicago

Northwestern


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Public Health in the News – January 24, 2015

Global

  • The mystery of tuberculosis revealed? Scientists have uncovered the family secrets of a bacterial killer that accounts for 1.3 million deaths worldwide. A team reconstructed the evolutionary history of the Beijing lineage of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, a strain associated with the massive spread of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis in Eurasia.
  • 2014 was the hottest year on record (since weather record have been kept), resulting in the symbolic doomsday clock moving to three minutes before midnight, as close as it’s been since the cold war.
  • Despite waning numbers, two pharmaceutical companies prepare to launch Ebola vaccine trails.
  • A great piece by a fashion historian about how fashion has (and can again) encourage vaccination.
  • Cholera cases in West and Central Africa tripled last year, particularly in Ghana, Nigeria, and DRC.

National

  • Only about 23% effective, this year’s flu vaccine flopped. So, how do we get a more effective flu vaccine? Bloomberg weighs in.
  • The CDC reports  that nearly one third of reproductive-age women in the US had an opioid painkiller prescription filled every year between 2008-2012, increasing risks for birth defects.
  • Between 2012 and 2014, a drug-resistant superbug infected 32 people at a Seattle hospital caused by a bacteria spreading through contaminated medical scopes.

Illinois/Chicago

  • The Chicago Department of Public Health (CDPH) awarded $13 million to more than 50 local non-profit organizations to provide HIV prevention and housing services to residents.
  • January is National Radon Action Month and the Chicago Department of Public Health (CDPH) encourages Chicagoans to test their home for harmful levels of radon.
  • Chicago State University ranks as one of the worst colleges in the nation when it comes to providing students with sexual health resources, a national survey found.
  • How are older city hospitals competing with newer suburban hospitals? See Crain’s analysis of why so many hospitals in Chicago sit empty.

Northwestern

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